When My Mother Died, My Father Quickly Started a New Life. I Chose to Forgive Him.

 
In wake of her mother's sudden death, musician Michelle Zauner (who performs under the name Japanese Breakfast) finds a way to make peace with her estranged father.
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When My Mother Died, My Father Quickly Started a New Life. I Chose to Forgive Him.
 
In wake of her mother's sudden death, musician Michelle Zauner (who performs under the name Japanese Breakfast) finds a way to make peace with her estranged father. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
Fran Drescher on the Enduring Charm of 'The Nanny'
 
The show's iconic star speaks to BAZAAR.com about the comedy's new home at HBO Max, her finest fashion moments, and what a reboot could look like one day. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I Grew Up in a Majority-Minority Country. We Still Have a Problem with Anti-Blackness
 
As the tragedy of George Floyd re-enters headlines, Amanda Choo Quan explores the ways that case exposed systemic, global anti-Blackness, even in supposed post-racial paradises like Trinidad and Tobago. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
Diane Keaton Struts Around the 'Mack & Rita' Set in Thigh-High Snakeskin Boots
 
These boots were made for strutting. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amy Winehouse's Mom Is Making a Documentary About the Singer's Life
 
"I don't feel the world knew the true Amy, the one that I brought up," Janis Winehouse said. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
Lorde, Our Elusive Queen, Briefly Returns with a Surprise Performance
 
She covered Bruce Springsteen with fellow musician Marlon Williams in her native New Zealand. Read More
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
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