Solo Exhibition: The Black Stories Project by Madison Casagrande

Solo Exhibition

The Black Stories Project

Introducing
Madison Casagrande

The wet plate collodion tintype process was first invented in the 1850s and became a primary photographic practice in the 1860s and 1870s, documenting much of the Civil War. The tintypes of the Black Stories Project embody the history of photography and the history of racial inequity in the United States and more specifically in the state of Utah. They draw a connection between the history of racism and the dialogue about race today. In a state where the black population is less than two percent and a dominant religious culture presents a unique and complicated narrative of the past and present, we can only address the current issues of systemic inequality while acknowledging and grappling with the history behind them. This project is a study about how the weight of our state's history and the lens through which it is told, affects how black individuals experience life here today. The Black Stories Project is made up of the portraits and voices of members of the black community here in Utah, and stands as an effort towards opening the conversation, understanding the past and changing the future narrative of our history.

Solo Exhibition 05/2021

Discover the Exhibition Curated by Brooke Shaden
view this email in your browser
Facebook
Twitter
Website
Instagram
Copyright © 2021 All About Photo, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in for our Newsletter at www.all-about-photo.com.

Our mailing address is:
All About Photo
Las Palmas Avenue
Escondido, CA 92025

Add us to your address book


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Commentaires

Posts les plus consultés de ce blog

Chris Ramsey can take the heat, but what would relegation for QPR mean for black managers in the Premier League?

How a team of innovators overcame the odds to create water from thin air

Britain's health service uses long Twitter thread to explain why it needs more black people to donate blood