The attacks that changed everything

Five pieces that grapple with the legacy of 9/11 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌
The Nation
As we mark the anniversary of the attacks of September 11th, here are five pieces that grapple with the legacy of the attacks that changed everything. From the story of a daughter who lost her father in the attacks, whose discomfort with the rituals of 9/11 grief, with their overtones of patriotism and vengeance, led her to travel to Guantánamo Bay, to the infringements on civil rights that endure to this day, to the War on Terror, which has proliferated beyond our worst fears.
I Lost My Father on 9/11, but I Never Wanted to Be a "Victim"
I never felt comfortable with the official rituals of 9/11 grief, with their overtones of patriotism and vengeance, so I sought other ways to use my role.
Leila Murphy
The Human Rights Violations of the 9/11 Era Are Still With Us
Public perception of the War on Terror has shifted dramatically. But its legal and policy infrastructure endures.
Anthony D. Romero
The War on Terror Is Still Alive and Well
Joe Biden deserves praise for pulling the troops out of Afghanistan—but 20 years after 9/11, the War on Terror continues.
Robert L. Borosage
The War on Terror: 20 Years of Bloodshed and Delusion
From the beginning, the War on Terror merged red-hot vengeance with calculated opportunism. Millions are still paying the price.
Tariq Ali
In the Shadow of 9/11
Did the War on Terror put our democracy at risk—or reveal its flaws?
Samuel Moyn
LOOKING BACK
The Nation has long stood firm against unnecessary and costly military intervention, bloated Pentagon budgets, and endless war. In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, the editors called for "justice not vengeance," while peace and disarmament correspondent Jonathan Schell cautioned that the US's response required "a sense of proportion." Columnist Katha Pollitt warned against the "jingoism and vengeance and war" symbolized by the American flag, and historian (and Nation editorial board member) Eric Foner foretold the coming infringements on our civil rights and civil liberties.
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