Native American Heritage Month

Smithsonian Institution
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
Painting of figures facing sunrise
The Dance to the Rising Sun, from the Sun Dance, Cheyenne. By Paul J. Goodbear (Chief Flying Eagle), Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne), 1937. Opaque watercolor painting on gouache paper. Likely presented by the artist to his friend Marion Hollenbach Saunders, who sold the piece to the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in 2018. Catalog Number 27/154.

November is Native American Heritage Month, a time to honor the diverse stories, vibrant traditions, and important contributions of Indigenous people, both historically and today.

Indigenous American culture is not a monolith: There are currently 574 federally recognized Native nations — each with unique languages, beliefs, and lifeways that have been passed down through generations — and millions of Americans who engage in traditional practices and create new ways to express their heritage and identity.

Join us in celebrating Native American Heritage Month today and throughout November with art, events, online exhibitions, and learning resources from across the Smithsonian!

Photograph of family riding horses on an overpass
Diné Family on Horseback. Ganado, Arizona, Navajo Nation, June 28, 2020. Photo by Donovan Quintero (Navajo), © Navajo Times, 2020.
• Discover complex stories of modern Native life as documented by three photojournalists in the exhibition Developing Stories: Native Photographers in the Field from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.
Native Cinema Showcase is an annual film festival highlighting the best Indigenous documentaries, kid-friendly shorts, music videos, and more! Watch online November 18-25.
Painting of mountain with traditional design.
Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), Orilla Verde at the Rio Grande, 2012, oil on wood panel, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment, 2021.30.3, © Kay Walkingstick, 2016.
• Learn about the bold paintings and unexpected techniques of artist Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee) through context, video, and an all-ages comic from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
• Explore the art and experiences of Black-Indigenous women in Ancestors Know Who We Are, an online exhibition featuring painting, photography, poetry, digital graphics, and first-person perspectives from scholars and artists.
Photograph of two servicemen
Navajo cousins Private First Class Preston Toledo (left) and Private First Class Frank Toledo were both Code Talkers. They served in a marine artillery regiment in the South Pacific. Photograph courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.
• During World Wars I and II, hundreds of American Indians utilized their native languages to subvert the enemy. Meet these "Code Talkers" through audio interviews and see how their secret messages were constructed.
Native Knowledge 360° offers a variety of resources that can help students and teachers gain a more comprehensive understanding of Native American history and cultures.
Photograph of exhibition with three art glass boxes
Moon, sun, and star boxes from Preston Singletary: Raven and the Box of Daylight. Organized by the artist and Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA. On display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Photograph by Lizzie Peabody.
• Listen to some of the Native stories shared by Smithsonian podcasts:
The Smithsonian is able to offer a more expansive look at the American experience across time, traditions, and mediums because of generous supporters like you — thank you!

Support Your Smithsonian »

© 2022 Smithsonian Institution
1000 Jefferson Dr SW, Washington, DC 20560
Unsubscribe
Privacy Policy

Commentaires

Posts les plus consultés de ce blog

Chris Ramsey can take the heat, but what would relegation for QPR mean for black managers in the Premier League?

'Game of Thrones' gave fans of Missandei and Grey Worm something to love tonight