What has the Arts Council done?

 
 
Plus: The Benin Bronzes go online
 
 
 
 
Get more great writing daily – save more than 20% on your first 3 months
Robert Hewison considers the Arts Council 'levelling up' claims
 
Robert Hewison considers the Arts Council's 'levelling up' claims
Like a small politbureau, the chief executive of the Arts Council England (ACE), Darren Henley, its head of communications, Mags Patten, and its chairman Sir Nicholas Serota sat shoulder to shoulder at a desk in the organisation's Manchester office for a livestreamed press conference. They were there to announce their spending plans for 2023–26. The format of the announcement, which had been delayed by the kerfuffles at Westminster, suited the hosts. Questions could be asked only by email, so it was difficult to extract any useful information, even when it emerged that English National Opera, one of the big four of England's performing arts organisations, was losing its £12.6 million a year funding in exchange for support to move out of London, probably to Manchester.
 
Read the full article
 

Subscribe to Apollo today

 
Samuel Reilly welcomes the online reunion of the Benin Bronzes
 
Samuel Reilly welcomes the online reunion of the Benin Bronzes
In a funny twist of fate, Digital Benin should come as no small consolation to those in the West who still decry the prospect of ceding ownership of the Bronzes. It is a remarkable achievement; the resources offer deeper, richer and more rewarding engagement with the history and meaning of these artefacts than anything yet provided by any Western museum.
 
Read the full article
 

 
Rose Higham-Stainton on the really radical art of Nellie Mae Rowe
 
Rose Higham-Stainton on the really radical art of Nellie Mae Rowe
Rowe knew about the domestic expectations placed on women, particularly African American women in the American South in the second half of the 20th century. Born in Georgia in 1900, she spent most of her life as a domestic help and the rest of it tending to husbands (there were two in rapid succession). She came to art-making late – retired into it, summoning a dormant creative impulse that had been buried for more than 50 years.
 
Read the full article
 

 
Vanessa Baird speaks to Millie Walton about her twisted fairy tales
 
Vanessa Baird speaks to Millie Walton about her twisted fairy tales
There are two recurring characters in Vanessa Baird's exhibition of watercolour drawings at No. 9 Cork Street, London. One is a cross-looking, yellow-skinned, bony old woman, wearing nothing but soiled diapers. The other is a woman dressed in a Disney-style Snow White costume, complete with puffy blue sleeves, a canary-coloured skirt and white apron... 'I have made myself the hero, the Disney princess,' says Baird.
 
Read the full article
 

 
Rosamund Bartlett on the remarkable career of Marianne Werefkin
 
Rosamund Bartlett on the remarkable career of Marianne Werefkin
As both an émigré and a modernist artist, Werefkin remained a taboo figure in her homeland until the late 1980s, but her Russian identity has been reclaimed in recent years thanks to the opening up of far-flung archives, and an enduring fascination with the 'amazons' of the pre-Revolutionary avant-garde, of whom she was one of the very first.
 
Read the full article
 

 
In the current issue…
 
Jane Morris asks if auction houses stand to gain from bypassing galleries
 
Jane Morris asks if auctions stand to gain from bypassing galleries
Up until the 1990s, contemporary art was a small, risky and difficult-to-understand section of the art world and the big auction houses were happy to largely leave it to the primary galleries. But the boom in international demand for contemporary art, which has led to the explosion in contemporary biennials and museums in the past 30 years, brought that separation to an end.
 
Read the full article
 

 
In the next issue…
 
Subscribe to Apollo today
 
More from Apollo
Current issue | Advertise | Podcasts
 
View this email in your browser
 
Follow us
Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
 
Apollo Magazine, 22 Old Queen Street, London, SW1H 9HP.
All Articles and Content Copyright © 2022 by Apollo Magazine. All Rights Reserved.
If you no longer wish to receive these emails, you can unsubscribe at any time.
To ensure our emails are delivered to your inbox, please add Apollo to your email address book and safe-sender list.
 
 

Commentaires

Posts les plus consultés de ce blog

Chris Ramsey can take the heat, but what would relegation for QPR mean for black managers in the Premier League?

'Game of Thrones' gave fans of Missandei and Grey Worm something to love tonight